• Brownstone Brooklyn Traffic Forum

last modified October 5, 2006 by naparstek

PSCC Community Forum on Traffic & Transpo: March 2. Park Slope.

The Park Slope Civic Council
Announcing a Community Forum on

Traffic & Transportation in Brownstone Brooklyn

Thursday, March 2nd from 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.

Old First Reformed Church, 7th Avenue at Carroll Street

 

February 20, 2006 –BROOKLYN – Endless honking, choked avenues, crowded trains, sluggish buses, and, let’s see… How many hours of my life did I spend last year hunting for a parking spot?

 

For this year’s community forum, the Park Slope Civic Council brings together some of New York City’s leading policy experts for an informative and entertaining discussion about the future of traffic and transportation in Brownstone Brooklyn. As the pace of development in and around Downtown Brooklyn accelerates, how will it affect our neighborhoods’ traffic and transportation infrastructure? What can we do to ensure that our transportation systems remain functional, and that our neighborhoods continue to be great places to live? Residential parking permits, East River Bridge tolls, car-free parks, bus rapid transit, the Atlantic Yards project – on March 2nd it’s all on the table for discussion. 

 

“New York City transportation policy is stuck in gridlock,” says PSCC Trustee Aaron Naparstek. “While cities around the world, big and small are reaping major economic, environmental and quality-of-life benefits by bringing traffic congestion under control, we’re fighting over whether we should have to ‘pay to pray’ at Sunday parking meters. It’s time to jump-start a meaningful public dialogue.”
 

Headlining the forum will be Fred Kent, the president of Project for Public Spaces (www.pps.org), a leading authority on revitalizing city spaces and one of the world’s foremost thinkers on livability, smart growth and the future of the city. Karla Quintero, project coordinator from Transportation Alternatives (www.transalt.org), will present preliminary findings of a groundbreaking study on the impacts of neighborhood traffic on health and social cohesion. And Jon Orcutt, executive director of the Tri-State Transportation Campaign (www.tstc.org), will talk about what we can do to push forward government policy. There will also be an exclusive sneak preview of the new documentary film, “Contested Streets: Breaking New York City Gridlock.” Representatives of the Department of Transportation, New York City Transit, major real estate developers and elected officials have been invited and there will be time for questions and answers.

 

The forum takes place on Thursday, March 2nd from 7:00 to 9:00pm, at the Old First Reformed Church on 7th Avenue at Carroll Street. Admission is free.

 

About the Park Slope Civic Council

Organized as the South Brooklyn Board of Trade in 1896, the Park Slope Civic Council is one of the oldest civic associations in Brooklyn. It represents over 700 families.  For more information, see: www.parkslopeciviccouncil.org

 

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