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September 9, 2008, New York - Today I received the following scoping information about auctions and comparative evaluations from the ICANN:

You first asked­ whether there were papers in preparation on other allocation methods for new gTLD strings. You also asked about the process.

The Economic Case paper only describes the case for auctions as a tie-breaking mechanism for resolving contention among competing generic TLD applications (but not for community-based applications if at least one community-based applicant in a contention set opts for comparative evaluation). The paper does not describe the proposed auction model. This is the subject of a paper soon to be released in advance of the considerable work in preparing a draft RFP for community review prior to the ICANN meeting in Cairo. A number of other papers are being prepared, including descriptions of contention set handling and comparative evalu­ation processes. I think once you, and other commenters, have an opportunity to review these papers, you will have a better understanding of the proposed process.

As other commenters on the forum have noted, many applicants applying for a gTLD may never have to go through the proposed auction process, if their application is not in contention with any other proposed string, or because they represent a particular community and opt for comparative evaluation.

I look forward to reviewing these papers upon their publication. 

Learn more about The Campaign on our wiki pages.

Filed September 9th, 2008 under Comparative Evaluation, Auction, ICANN
  1. See? I told you!

    Comment by Joly on September 22, 2008 at 6:42 pm

  2. Hello,

    I would like to note that my photo is NOT creative commons, and is listed as being “all rights reserved.” I would like to request its removal and also ask that in the future you obtain permission before using people’s images.

    Comment by Neshachan on June 8, 2009 at 12:07 pm

  3. Today I received a request from Neshachan to remove a photo that adorned this page, as per the above email. It was a nice photo which I accidentally read on Flicker as a commons photo.

    I’ve removed it and I extend my apologies for any misuse. And I’ll be doubly sure to check for the commons designation.

    Thank you for alerting me to this.

    Sincerely,

    Thomas Lowenhaupt

    Comment by Thomas Lowenhaupt on June 8, 2009 at 9:51 pm

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