dotnyc-logo-3-11-07.jpgJackson Hts., New York, August 22, 2011 - We preach and practice open and transparent. From our earliest days in 2005 the vast majority of our activities have been accessible on our wiki and blog. Today 66 people have editing rights on our wiki. Edit access is easy to come by: click the Join CoActivate button on the top right, and upon responding to an email, you’ll have edit capabilities. (We originally didn’t have email verification, but spammers drove us to lower our openness a notch.) The reversible nature of the wiki technology facilitates openness as real damage from errors or mischief is near impossible. (Please don’t take this as a challenge to  prove me wrong.)

The wiki has become huge over those years with our newest page, iCity, our 184th. Some are quite short, perhaps a 1/2 page of text, with the largest requiring 25 single spaced typed pages.

Following all this can be challenging. The blog notifies about big changes - we’ve made 197 posts - but if you want to follow the nitty-gritty about recently created and updated pages, click the green Contents tab up top for a list of all the pages. The “Last Modified” tab will show what’s been changed in time order. (It’s a bit klutzy and we’re hoping for a one click “Recent Changes” button from our most gracious host, CoActivate.) And to see the page changes, click the History button on top right.

So what’s new? Here are the 11 most recently edited pages: one is a new page, and the others have a mix of minor to major changes:

We’ve listed 11 instead of the typical 10 to draw your attention to our Governance Ecology pages. We’re going to be making some major changes to them over the next few weeks and we’d like more people to join us. They’ll provide the basis for our recommendations for governance of the TLD - perhaps the most critical issue. We’re going to include the latest wrinkles from ICANN on qualifications for a city-TLD as well as a look at the expected “consensus” demonstration criteria expected of IANA.

The .nyc TLD’s future is up to you. Join our resident led endeavor, and contribute your ideas to this most important civic enterprise.

Learn more about our overall effort from our Wiki Home Page

farm-roof-film.jpgBrooklyn Grange, Long Island City, August 7, 2011 - I’m writing this from a most pleasant film event at a farm in Long Island City. Those outside the city (and most in it as well) will do a blink/flinch at the thought of farms in New York City, but rooftop farms are the latest-greatest. Brooklyn Grange runs the one I’m at, sitting with my feet carefully avoiding trampling the lettuce surrounding them, waiting for the films to start. (Check with Rooftop Films about tonight’s and other films they sponsor.)

Waiting for the films to start my mind wondered to the domain name farms.nyc. Does it have a value? If so to whom? How is it allocated? etc.

It’s not a new topic, actually pretty central to the entire development of our TLD (see our DNAP), but I figured a post about farms.nyc would be an interesting way to raise these questions anew. As well, we’re making farms.nyc the start off point for Thursday’s Tea and TLDs conference call. To participate, see the invite on Meetup, or just go to our Google+ Hangout on Thursday morning between 10 and 11.

Hope to see you Thursday.

Learn more about our overall effort from our Wiki Home Page

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Jackson Hts., New York, August 5, 2011 - Connecting.nyc Inc. last week filed comments on a Further Notice of Inquiry issued by the NTIA on a proposed contract with IANA (Internet Assigned Numbering Authority.)  IANA is responsible for the global coordination of the DNS Root, IP addressing, and other Internet protocol resources. 

Our comments focused on the formation and demonstration of consensus associated with filing an application for a new TLD, a vital task as public engagement is central to the optimization of the TLD’s operation and  equitable distribution of the resource.

The proposed IANA contract would require that it assure that community “consensus” was behind applications for new TLDs. We supported the consensus requirement, and we offered as guidance the point-based guidelines the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) uses to assess local engagement in Choice Neighborhood applications. For example, the HUD guidelines state:

Resident and Community Engagement – 3 points. For this rating factor, you will be evaluated based on the extent to which you demonstrate that you have involved and will continue to involve neighborhood residents (including residents of the targeted public and/or assisted housing), local businesses, and community organizations in a sustained, informed and substantive way in the development and implementation of the Transformation Plan. Your application should demonstrate the impact of their involvement in shaping the vision for the neighborhood.

(1) Points will be awarded to the extent that your application:

      (a) Describes how residents of all ages as well as community-based organizations and local businesses are, and will continue to be, well informed and substantively engaged in the neighborhood transformation planning and implementation process. Explains key roles these interested parties have played in shaping the development of the Transformation Plan, and how you will ensure that local stakeholders’ concerns remain at the forefront of decision-making moving forward;

      (b) Includes a summary of representative resident and community recommendations and concerns from meetings and other forms of communication and an explanation of how this resident and community input has been addressed through the components of your proposed Transformation Plan;

      (c) Describes the capacity building, training, and other supports that have been and/or will be provided to residents and the community in order to increase informed, substantive, and sustained participation in the development and implementation of the Transformation Plan and ensure long-term accountability to the proposed vision; and

      (d) Describes your system for tracking and monitoring local stakeholder satisfaction and how this has aided and will aid you in assessing and adapting your ongoing Resident and Community Engagement strategy.

(2) You will receive up to 3 points if you demonstrate that you have a feasible, well- defined, and high-quality Resident and Community Engagement strategy, which addresses all of the above criteria.

(3) You will receive fewer points for failure to address all of the above criteria, failure to address the criteria in a sufficient manner, and for lack of specificity.

(4) You will receive zero points for failure to demonstrate that your Resident and Community Engagement strategy addresses any of the above criteria or your application does not address this factor to an extent that makes HUD’s rating of this factor possible.

As well, we pointed to other consensus assessment resources in our comments which are available here.

Learn more about our overall effort from our Wiki Home Page

Filed August 6th, 2011 under Oversight, NTIA, Civics, Education, Governance

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