• ICANN

last modified February 22, 2011 by tomlowenhaupt

The Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Number was created in 1998 pursuant to the United States government's desire to find a process for the long term oversight of various Internet functions.


The Elephant and the Mouse

There's a long time argument about the scope of the ICANN: Is it just a technical oversight entity, as its supporters claim, or a future global governance behemoth, as some critics declare?

It's easy to understand the common description of the ICANN, as the regulator of various Internet technical functions: the Domain Name System, Autonomous System Numbers, and so forth...

There are supporters who say it somethings steps outside its "technical" bounds and serves as a regulatory entity. But generally, most agree it acts as a technical oversight body.

To see the ICANN as a future behemoth, possibly the global government, requires a leap of faith or two.

The story here begins with the presumption that we're living in an increasingly digital world. Few argue with this.

Step two in the global government argument notes that our money is now digital. Few disagree with this: it's certainly not gold or silver, and while you can get paper, for all practical purposes, it's basically digital. Leap one says that as ICANN gets to control all things digital, it gets control of our money.

The second leap presents software code as like physics: Other things being equal, it is predictable and consistent time after time. And if ICANN controls the flow and function of code, it controls all - much as the laws of physics control the universe.

Ponderings of this sort are probably a leap too far, but minimally useful to the science fiction writers.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


ICANN is a California not-for-profit corporation. According to the ICANN's home page,

"ICANN is responsible for the global coordination of the Internet's system of unique identifiers [Domain Names]. These include domain names (like .org, .museum and country codes like .UK), as well as the addresses used in a variety of Internet protocols. Computers use these identifiers to reach each other over the Internet. Careful management of these resources is vital to the Internet's operation, so ICANN's global stakeholders meet regularly to develop policies that ensure the Internet's ongoing security and stability."

Board Member Appointments

Membership to ICANN's ruling body, its Board of Directors, is controlled by a complex process. The following shows the entities that control those appointments. 

dotNYC-Icann-Organization-Structure-January-2011.jpg

Members

New members to the ICANN's Board of Directors are selected regularly. Click here to see the current members of the ICANN's Board.

Nominating Committee

Several members of the board are selected by a Nominating Committee. Its operation rules found at ARTICLE VII: NOMINATING COMMITTEE. The following are pertinent sections.

Section 1. DESCRIPTION

There shall be a Nominating Committee of ICANN, responsible for the selection of all ICANN Directors except the President and those Directors selected by ICANN's Supporting Organizations, and for such other selections as are set forth in these Bylaws.

Section 2. COMPOSITION

The Nominating Committee shall be composed of the following persons:

1. A non-voting Chair, appointed by the ICANN Board;

2. The immediately previous Nominating Committee Chair, as a non-voting advisor;

3. A non-voting liaison appointed by the ICANN Root Server System Advisory Committee established by Article XI of these Bylaws;

4. A non-voting liaison appointed by the ICANN Security and Stability Advisory Committee established by Article XI of these Bylaws;

5. A non-voting liaison appointed by the Governmental Advisory Committee;

6. Subject to the provisions of the Transition Article of these Bylaws, five voting delegates selected by the At-Large Advisory Committee established by Article XI of these Bylaws;

7. Two voting delegates, one representing small business users and one representing large business users, selected by the Business Users Constituency of the Generic Names Supporting Organization established by Article X of these Bylaws;

8. One voting delegate each selected by the following entities:

a. The gTLD Registry Constituency of the Generic Names Supporting Organization established by Article X of these Bylaws;

b. The gTLD Registrars Constituency of the Generic Names Supporting Organization established by Article X of these Bylaws;

c. The Council of the Country Code Names Supporting Organization established by Article IX of these Bylaws;

d. The Internet Service Providers Constituency of the Generic Names Supporting Organization established by Article X of these Bylaws;

e. The Intellectual Property Constituency of the Generic Names Supporting Organization established by Article X of these Bylaws;

f. The Council of the Address Supporting Organization established by Article VIII of these Bylaws;

g. An entity designated by the Board to represent academic and similar organizations;

h. Consumer and civil society groups, selected by the Non-commercial Users Constituency of the Generic Names Supporting Organization established by Article X of these Bylaws;

i. The Internet Engineering Task Force; and

j. The ICANN Technical Liaison Group established by Article XI-A of these Bylaws; and

9. A non-voting Associate Chair, who may be appointed by the Chair, at his or her sole discretion, to serve during all or part of the term of the Chair. The Associate Chair may not be a person who is otherwise a member of the same Nominating Committee. The Associate Chair shall assist the Chair in carrying out the duties of the Chair, but shall not serve, temporarily or otherwise, in the place of the Chair.

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