This is a generic version of an email I recently sent to a not-for-profit organisation that runs a web-based platform for community exchange. Feel free to use it as a model for encouraging other not-for-profits to use and promote free code software.

————————————–

Greetings

I recently received an email from GratisService.org [insert here the name of a not-for-profit running a gratis, web-based service] asking for a monetary donation. I really value the GratisService.org service, and I’ve [description of how I used the service] through your website on many occasions. However, as a point of principle, when a not-for-profit’s primary activities are software-based, I only donate to them if they respect the software freedom of the people who use their services.

There are two elements to this:

1) using only free code (or “open source”) software to provide the service

2) providing a page linked from the front page of the website, listing the various free code packages used to provide the service, including code developed by other groups, and code developed by the group providing the service.

I’ve looked around GratisService.org a few times, but there’s no indication of what software it uses. Adding such a page (eg as a technical FAQ) would satisfy point 2). I’m guessing that most of the software you use to run the service is free code. In order to satisfy point 1), if you have proprietary dependencies I’d be happy to help you find free code replacements for them, and if you have internally developed code that hasn’t been released as free code under a software freedom license yet, I’d be happy to help you do that.

This guide provides more detailed information about these issues: https://copyleft.org/guide/comprehensive-gpl-guidech2.html

In the meantime, keep up the good work.

Warm regards

Danyl Strype

Filed June 17th, 2017 under free software

640px-SoundscapeHamilton.jpg 

(SoundScape Hamilton 2011, by Nzwj - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, Link)

New Zealand Music Month (NZMM) is over for another year. I managed to promote 37 CreativeCommons-licensed kiwi music releases on the Fediverse, 38 if you count the one that ended up being posted a couple of minutes into June, and 39 if you count this year’s Turnbull Mixtape (#5: Time to get schooled). These releases covered 35 different music acts, across a diverse range of genres (no ukelele bands yet!).

To be honest, I was originally worried that I might  be scraping the barrel to get to 31 (one for each day in May). In the end, I ran out of May long before I ran out of releases to promote, mainly thanks to the Turnbull librarians and their mixtapes from the last few years. Thanks Turnbull folks!

A couple of thoughts on CC Aotearoa/ NZ engagement with kiwi musicians going forward. Firstly, it would be great to contact as many of these artists as possible about their CC use, and how they feel its worked for them (or not). Trying to interview all of them before next NZMM would be an average of about one a week, which would be a huge ask, so it might be good to aim to get a handful of interviews across a set of categories. Some of the obvious categories are;

  • always use CC
  • only used CC for one release
  • used to use CC then stopped for newer releases
  • started using CC after numerous ARR releases.

Another distinction I noticed was digital downloads offered gratis with no obvious way to pay/ donate, downloads on a ‘pay what you want’ basis, and downloads with a fixed price, just like a physical record. Some may have even used multiple styles across different web platforms (eg fixed price on BandCamp, free streaming/ download on SoundCloud). Again, it would be interesting to find out what motivated musicians’ choices here, how they feel it worked out for them, and whether they intend to experiment with a different approach in future.

Secondly, there’s definitely enough music acts using CC licenses to put on some amazing concerts for next year’s NZMM. Maybe even a CC music festival, or a touring roadshow! This would be a great chance to raise awareness of CC licensing among musicians and their audiences, and creative communities generally. Roll on NZ Music Month 2018!

Filed June 5th, 2017 under Uncategorized

I’ve been collecting information on free code chat software for a while now as part of research for the Core Us project. If anyone is keen to join an organised testing team and have a regular online chat session, using different chat systems, please get in touch. Today I’ve been looking into which chat systems might be the best options for integration with a Loomio, a web-based deliberation and decision-making platform.

My evaluations

 Etherpad: Text chat only. Collapsed until clicked. Once clicked, appears as a smallish GoogleChat-alike box in the bottom right of the screen. Can be expanded into a sidebar, or collapsed back down.

 Meet.jit.si: Demo of Jitsi Meet/ Videobridge. No login required on the demo site, just create a “room” (eg meet.jit.si/loomio), and anyone who enters the URL for that room automatically joins the chat. I recently used it for a one-to-one, voice-only chat. Other than a tiny bit of lag, which was only mildly disruptive, the experience was good. Supports text chat, (collapsible sidebar), voice, video, screen-sharing, text editing using an integrated Etherpad. A livestreaming output allows a 2-way chat among a small group over people to be streamed to a larger, listen-only audience (akin to Hangouts on Air), and presumably recorded for later viewing.

 MetaMaps: chat is in the form of a sidebar, collapsed until a button on the side of the screen is clicked, collapse back with a second click. Each map has its own chat ‘room’, and text comments made on a map persist in the chat box for that map between sessions. Supports voice and video, not yet tested. A bit harder to evaluate without setting it up on your own server, because they’re currently in invite-only beta.

Mumble / Murmur: Mumble clients are available for all major platforms, but the default interface is basically like IRC plus voice (no video), and may be confusing for people who aren’t used to IRC. Each Murmur server can host many rooms (rooms within rooms). If you are in the same ‘room’ as another user, you can hear each other, and it easily supports large numbers of users in the same room. Mic can be always-on, but I strongly suggest using push-to-talk, which reduces background noise, feedback, and bandwidth use. Plus, the user’s avatar visibly changes when they push-to-talk, giving some sense of who is waiting to speak.

Palava.tv: A WebRTC stack like Jitsi Meet, but only supporting the bare bones text/ voice/ video chat. The interface is much less polished than Jitsi. Would be interesting to compare the call quality between the same two people, on the same equipment and network connections. Palava also seems to be a patchwork of code in a bunch of different languages, whereas Jitsi (and Etherpad) are pure Javascript, and might be easier to integrate with a RoR application.

 Riot.im: A text chat server with multiple ‘rooms’. Basically a prettier, federated, web-based version of an IRC/ Mumble type interface,  but using the Matrix protocol. Also supports file sharing. Has annoying no-reply email notifications turned on by default, but you can unsub from the bottom of each email, and the notification control in the Settings is pretty fine-grained. Overall pretty similar to RockChat (but without the WebRTC voice/ video extensions), and I imagine pretty similar to MatterMost, as they are all basically free code Slack-a-likes.

 

Process of elimination

Trying to re-engineer a system expressly designed to be P2P chat seems like a fools errand, especially when those P2P tools are the various parts of Tox, an outgrowth of 4Chan with a tumultuous history, and somewhat consistent development progress. Ring is a more promising P2P chat project that recently joined the GNU Project, but it’s still in beta, and voice/ video conference calls are still bleeding edge. It doesn’t seem like there is protocol support for XMPP (plus MUC and Jingle), which may be a smoother way to handle conference calls (although maybe less secure), but adding that would be a huge engineering challenge.

Re-using code that’s designed for the web is probably simplest approach. Of the Slack-a-likes, Riot is probably the most interesting because it can federate with Matrix protocols, but as a consequence, it’s probably also the most bleeding edge. Besides which, federation is fairly low down the priority list for integration with a group-based app like Loomio (or Crabgrass, also RoR), which doesn’t currently support any kind of server federation. The ideal candidate would be a module that’s intended for adding chat features to a web application, written in languages that work in nicely with RoR.

 

Shortlist for possible Loomio integration

  • Etherpad is pure Javascript, and adapting the chat box modules of their code might be a way to add a collapsible, text-only chat box to Loomio. This might be a good experimental first step, as its likely to introduce fewer bugs than a chat box with voice and video too.
  • MetaMaps is a Ruby on Rails app, like Loomio, so it may be possible to add a similar chat sidebar to Loomio using the same modules MM chat depends on, or if necessary, by modularizing those parts of the MM code. This might be a good experiment #2.
  • Meet.jit.si ticks a lot of the right boxes. A self-hosted version of their stack could be set up alongside a Loomio server, with rooms sharing the same namespace and access permissions as Loomio groups and subgroups, and the same authentication layer. This would provide a full-featured live collaboration environment, including collaborative text drafting with the Etherpad integration, which is currently a missing feature resulting in a lot of Google Docs. It’s a complicated stack though, with a lot of moving parts, and some careful thought would have to be given to how to integrate the two interfaces smoothly.
  • Mumble: Building a web client for a system server designed to work with desktop clients can work (eg webmail and web-based IRC and XMPP clients), but this would be a major re-engineering job with no certainty of success, and using Mumble for a text only chat feature would certainly be overkill. A minimal web GUI that uses a Murmur server as a back-end for voice conference rooms, obscuring the fiddly business of connecting to a server and navigating through rooms, would make it much easier to use, and would most likely scale better than WebRTC. Underneath the GUI, Mumble rooms could be associated with Loomio groups, and rooms inside each rooms associated with subgroups. This could be a long term solution, but would take a lot of building.
  • Annual Events

  • Digital Freedom Foundation
  • LibrePlanet
  • Aotearoa

  • Aotearoa Indymedia
  • BallaNZ
  • Creative Commons Aotearoa/ NZ
  • Creative Freedom Foundation
  • DigitalNZ
  • Enspiral
  • Fair Deal Coalition
  • GreenStage
  • InternetNZ
  • Island Bay World Service
  • Living Economies
  • Localise
  • Loomio
  • Matrix FM
  • Nicky Hagar
  • No Right Turn
  • NZ Council for Civil Liberties
  • NZ Makers
  • NZ Makers Map
  • NZ Māori Internet Society
  • NZ Open Source Awards
  • NZCommons
  • OASIS
  • Open Government Ninjas of NZ
  • Open Source Society of NZ
  • Open Standards NZ
  • Open Ur Eyes
  • Pacific Media Centre
  • Permaculture in NZ
  • PledgeMe
  • Radio Chomsky
  • Regulation
  • Scoop
  • Tech Liberty
  • Timebank Aotearoa
  • Transition Towns Aotearoa/ NZ
  • Uncensored Magazine
  • Waatea News
  • Waikato Linux Users Group
  • What If
  • Wiki NZ
  • Zenbu
  • archives

  • ArchiveTeam
  • Critical Commons
  • Ibiblio
  • Internet Archive Community Software Collection
  • Open Archives Initiative
  • Blogroll

  • Abject
  • Access Now
  • Ars Technica
  • Autonomo.us
  • BadScience
  • Banjo - RoboBlog
  • Boing Boing
  • Born out of Binary
  • Centre for Media and Democracy
  • Choke Point Project
  • Copyrighteous
  • Create Digital Music
  • Creative Commons International
  • Cryptogon
  • Digital Standards Organisations
  • Disinfo
  • E-Democracy
  • Electronic Privacy Information Center
  • Ever Vigilant
  • Freedom Box Foundation
  • Freedom of the Press Foundation
  • Gaming On Linux
  • Global Indymedia
  • Gondwanaland (Mike Linksvayer)
  • Institute for the Future of the Book
  • Institute of Network Cultures
  • Internet Governance Project
  • InternetNZ
  • Island Bay World Service
  • Iterating Towards Openness
  • Knowledge Ecology International
  • LinkedListCorruption
  • Linuxed - Exploring Linux Distros
  • Localise
  • Moved by Freedom - Powered By Standards
  • Nanowares
  • New Zealand Māori Internet Society
  • Nicky Hagar
  • No Right Turn
  • NZ Council for Civil Liberties
  • NZCommons
  • O'Reilly Radar
  • OASIS
  • OERu Technology Blog
  • Open Educational Resources Foundation
  • Open Knowledge Foundation
  • Open Rights Group
  • Open Social Web
  • Open Source Conscious Intelligence Network
  • Open Source Food
  • Open Stand
  • Open Ur Eyes
  • OpenCollective
  • OpenDotDotDot
  • OpenSource.com
  • Permaculture in NZ
  • Plumi
  • Public Interest Journalism Foundation
  • Punk Rock Permaculture
  • Question Copyright
  • Replicant (OS)
  • Rob Meyers
  • Schneier on Security
  • Scoop
  • Shareable
  • Slashdot
  • Software Freedom Law Centre
  • Software in the Public Interest
  • SourceMap
  • Sustento Institute
  • Tech Liberty
  • TechRights
  • The Tin Hat
  • Tinkering Down Under
  • TorrentFreak
  • TransitionMovement
  • Translation Project
  • Trisquel GNU/ Linux
  • United Diversity
  • Waatea News
  • We Speak for Freedom
  • Why Your Boss is Programmed To Be a Dictator
  • code bank

  • Allura
  • BitBucket
  • FusionForge
  • GITHub
  • GITLab
  • Gogs
  • Internet Archive Community Software Collection
  • LaunchPad
  • NotABug
  • Savannah
  • Software Freedom Conservancy
  • Software Heritage
  • Sourceforge
  • community economics

  • Commons Transition
  • Fruit Tree Planting Foundation
  • In Our Back Yards
  • Institute for Local Self-Reliance
  • Libre-Living
  • Living Economies
  • Sensorica
  • Sustainable Economy Law Centre
  • Timebank Aotearoa
  • TransitionMovement
  • cooperative

  • Loomio
  • Snowdrift Coop
  • crowdfunding

  • ArtistShare
  • BountySource
  • Causes
  • CauseVox
  • Crowdfunder
  • Crowdjustice
  • Crowdrise
  • Crowdsupply
  • Flattr
  • Fundit.buzz
  • GiveaLittle
  • Goteo
  • In Our Back Yards
  • KickStarter
  • KissKissBankBank
  • Liberapay
  • Mighty Cause
  • OpenGift
  • Patreon
  • PledgeMe
  • PledgeMusic
  • Pozible
  • Snowdrift Coop
  • StartSomeGood
  • Taproot Foundation
  • The Working World
  • Tidelift
  • Events

  • IndieWebCamp
  • free code

  • April
  • Black Duck Open Hub
  • DistroWatch
  • Ever Vigilant
  • F-Droid
  • Free Software Directory (GNU FDL 1.3 or later)
  • Free Software Support Network
  • Free Software Support Network
  • Free Your Android
  • FreshCode
  • Gogs
  • Gun.io
  • Internet Archive Community Software Collection
  • LILA
  • LinuxTracker
  • NotABug
  • OERu Technology Blog
  • Peers Community
  • Plumi
  • PublicLab
  • Replicant (OS)
  • Software Heritage
  • Urchn Studios
  • Free Media

  • Communes Collective
  • Copyrighteous
  • Create Digital Music
  • Definition of Free Cultural Works
  • Dyne Foundation
  • FLOSSManuals
  • Free Culture Foundation
  • Ibiblio
  • Librivox
  • LILA
  • Open Video Conference
  • Show Me Do
  • Translation Project
  • Urchn Studios
  • WikiLeaks
  • freelancing

  • BountySource
  • Gun.io
  • independent media

  • Aotearoa Indymedia
  • BallaNZ
  • EngageMedia
  • Freedom of the Press Foundation
  • LILA
  • Matrix FM
  • Pacific Media Centre
  • Public Interest Journalism Foundation
  • Radio Chomsky
  • Radio Heritage Foundation
  • Uncensored Magazine
  • Waatea News
  • libre gaming

  • Gaming On Linux
  • Makers

  • GreenStage
  • Libre-Living
  • Mediamatic
  • NZ Makers
  • NZ Makers Map
  • Open ROV
  • Renewable PCs
  • Rob Meyers
  • Sensorica
  • maps

  • GeoForAll
  • GeoNames
  • Green Map System
  • Map Tools
  • Open Geospatial Foundation
  • Open Street Map
  • open governance

  • Crowdfunding
  • D-Cent
  • Deep Democracy Institute International
  • E-Democracy
  • Fight for the Future
  • Holacracy
  • Internet Governance Project
  • Kettering Foundation
  • Knowledge Sharing Toolkit (CC-BY-SA 3.0)
  • Open Government Ninjas of NZ
  • Open Policy Network
  • Open Space World (CC-BY-SA 2.5)
  • Open Stand
  • Open Standards NZ
  • Participedia
  • Sunlight Foundation
  • Transition Towns Aotearoa/ NZ
  • What If
  • WikiLeaks
  • open hardware

  • H-Node
  • Makey Makey
  • Meeblip Open Source Bass Synth
  • Open Hardware Summit
  • Open ROV
  • Open Source Hardware Association
  • Orgs

  • Access Now
  • Apache Foundation
  • April
  • Autistici/Inventati
  • Collaborative Knowledge Foundation
  • Commons Transition
  • Communes Collective
  • Computer Professionals for Social Responsibility
  • Creative Commons Aotearoa/ NZ
  • Creative Freedom Foundation
  • Critical Commons
  • D-Cent
  • Deep Democracy Institute International
  • Digital Due Process coalition
  • Digital Freedom Foundation
  • Digital Standards Organisations
  • DigitalNZ
  • Dyne Foundation
  • E-Democracy
  • Electronic Frontiers Foundation
  • Electronic Privacy Information Center
  • Fair Tracing Project
  • Fight for the Future
  • Foundation for Peer-to-Peer Alternatives
  • Free Culture Foundation
  • Free Network Foundation
  • Free Software Foundation
  • Free Software Support Network
  • Free Software Support Network
  • Freedom of the Press Foundation
  • Guifi
  • Ibiblio
  • Identity Commons
  • Institute for Local Self-Reliance
  • Internet Engineering Taskforce
  • Internet Governance Project
  • ISA Commons
  • Kettering Foundation
  • LEAP Encryption Access Project
  • LILA
  • Living Economies
  • Loomio
  • May First/ People Link
  • Mediamatic
  • NZ Māori Internet Society
  • NZ Open Source Awards
  • Open Architecture Network
  • Open Archives Initiative
  • Open Geospatial Foundation
  • Open Policy Network
  • Open Source Hardware Association
  • Open Source Society of NZ
  • Open Web Foundation
  • OpenADR Alliance
  • OpenCorporates
  • OpenHatch
  • Participatory Culture Foundation
  • Peers Community
  • Permaculture in NZ
  • Privacy International
  • Public Citizen
  • Public Interest Journalism Foundation
  • Public Knowledge
  • Public Patent Foundation
  • Question Copyright
  • Radio Heritage Foundation
  • ReDecentralize
  • Reform Government Surveillance
  • Regulation
  • Rhizome
  • RiseUp
  • Science Commons
  • Software Carpentry Foundation
  • Software Freedom Conservancy
  • Sunlight Foundation
  • Sustainable Economy Law Centre
  • Taproot Foundation
  • Transition Towns Aotearoa/ NZ
  • Waikato Linux Users Group
  • Wiki NZ
  • World Wide Web Consortium (WC3)
  • Xiph.org
  • XMPP Standards Foundation
  • Peer2Peer

  • BitCoin
  • FreeCoin
  • Permaculture

  • Appropedia (CC-BY-SA 3.0)
  • Fruit Tree Planting Foundation
  • Future Scenarios
  • OrganicDesign
  • Permaculture in NZ
  • TransitionMovement
  • We Speak for Freedom
  • Privacy

  • Access Now
  • Digital Due Process coalition
  • Ever Vigilant
  • Fight for the Future
  • International Principles on the Application of Human Rights to Communications Surveillance
  • LEAP Encryption Access Project
  • OASIS
  • Privacy International
  • Reform Government Surveillance
  • What If
  • protocols and licensing

  • Definition of Free Cultural Works
  • Digital Standards Organisations
  • Greenlots
  • ISA Commons
  • Open Archives Initiative
  • Open Stand
  • Open Standards NZ
  • Open Web Foundation
  • OpenADR Alliance
  • Regular Events

  • Libre Graphics Meeting
  • Open Hardware Summit
  • science and datasets

  • AllTrials
  • Collaborative Knowledge Foundation
  • DigitalNZ
  • Fair Tracing Project
  • ISA Commons
  • Open Geospatial Foundation
  • Open Hand Project
  • SourceMap
  • Wiki NZ
  • Zooniverse
  • Tools

  • Autistici/Inventati
  • BitCoin
  • Black Duck Open Hub
  • CoActivate
  • Crowdfunding
  • DistroWatch
  • Dyne Foundation
  • F-Droid
  • FLOSSManuals
  • Fork the Cookbook
  • FreeCoin
  • GITHub
  • GNU Operating System
  • GreenStage
  • H-Node
  • How To Escape the GoogleMax Panopticon
  • Knowledge Sharing Toolkit (CC-BY-SA 3.0)
  • LEAP Encryption Access Project
  • LinuxTracker
  • Loomio
  • Map Tools
  • May First/ People Link
  • Meeblip Open Source Bass Synth
  • Monolith
  • Open Hand Project
  • Open Source Ecology
  • Open Space World (CC-BY-SA 2.5)
  • Open Street Map
  • OpenCorporates
  • OpenMailBox
  • Participatory Culture Foundation
  • Plumi
  • Renewable PCs
  • Replicant (OS)
  • RiseUp
  • Savannah
  • Show Me Do
  • Sourceforge
  • SourceMap
  • TransforMap
  • Translation Project
  • Web Platform
  • Zenbu
  • Transition

  • Green Map System
  • Health After Oil
  • Localise
  • OrganicDesign
  • Wiki

  • Appropedia (CC-BY-SA 3.0)
  • Foundation for Peer-to-Peer Alternatives
  • Instructables
  • LibrePlanet
  • Open (Government) NZ
  • Participedia
  • SourceWatch
  • WikiEducator
  • wireless mesh

  • Guifi
  • workplace democracy

  • Enspiral
  • The Working World