FarceBook have been getting a lot of heat since the mosque shootings were livestreamed on their platform. But the software freedom movement seem to be able the only people talking about the ambitious solution that’s really required; replacing FB with ethical services controlled by the people who use them, not a tech corporation and its data buyers and advertisers. There are a people saying that we need a federated replacement for FB, using free code software. But is that really a viable solution? Here’s what I think would be required to create one.

First, we’d need a large-scale, crowdsourced UX (User eXperience ) design project. This would involve current FB users explaining exactly what features they use and how they use them, and a group of designers gradually building up mockups of a replacement UX. The designers would go through a number of iterations of presenting their mockups to the users for feedback and tweaking their designs in response. The outcome of this project would be a coherent UX design for both a website and native apps for desktop and mobile platforms.

During the course of the UX design project, a list of required features/ functions would need to be compiled. Decisions would need to be made about which of these could be implemented on the client-side (as many as possible, particularly data storage) and which would need remote servers. The second part of the project would involve identifying which of the features required by the UX could be implemented using existing free code components, which ones would need new code, and how the whole service could fit together efficiently. This would be a complicated set of decisions, because although building completely from scratch would be reinventing the wheel, the alternative requires evaluating hundreds or thousands of potential dependencies for code quality, and how likely it is to be maintained effectively in the long term.

The third part of the project, once the choices about initial design and back-end component re-use/ development had been made, would be to put the whole thing together as a proof-of-concept service. At this point, people who participated in the original crowdsourced UX design project could be contacted to see if they would like to be beta testers. Again, there would need to be a number of iterations where the service and UI was tweaked in response to tester feedback.

Unless there is some way to make our FB replacement an entirely serverless system like Jami or Briar, the long-term organizational and financial durability of instances (servers running the federated server software) is a problem that needs to be solved before federated social networks are ready for mainstream use. During the prototyping phase some serious thought would need to be given to how to provision the servers the production services will rely on. Our experiences with the fediverse so far have shown that we can’t just rely on random people setting up instances, which may vanish without a trace at any time. If our FB replacement ties users to a domain name, as the ActivityPub fediverse does, there will need to reliable organizations running instances (like cooperative businesses, associations with paid membership, or well-funded charities). It would be better if it used Zot (like Hubzilla and Zap), configured in such a way that every user’s account exists on at least two instances at any given time, so if one goes down, the account is automatically copied from the surviving one to another one.

Once the alpha and beta phase of prototyping was finished, and a stable 1.0 release of both the client-side apps and server-side software was available that included tools for importing users’ data from their FB account (a tasks that I imagine FB do everything in their power to make as difficult as possible), there would need to be a massive organizational and promotional effort to get reliable instances set up, and convince groups of users to set up accounts and start using them.

Some might say I’m making this seem way more complicated than it needs to be. After all, we’ve already created a federated replacement for Titter. But my whole point is that FB is a much more complicated system to replace and people are much more dependent on it. Titter has only two features, a public micro-blog (short text messages published on the web), and private text messages, and the fediverse as a whole has only implemented the first one. Some fediverse apps have “private” messages, but they don’t yet federate reliably across all apps and most (eg the Mastodon/ Pleroma DMs or “Direct Messages”) are private only in the sense they are not displayed publicly on those platforms. DMs sent to servers running other fediverse apps are liable to just treat them like any other public post. Only servers running Zot apps have any kind of encryption or proper controls over private messages and media.

FB consists of a wide range of features; not just posts, but an event system, encrypted realtime chat (including voice/ video), photo-sharing and galleries, web video and video livestreaming, pages, groups, and more. Many of these features have both public and private versions. While FB’s privacy protection is far from exemplary, a system being promoted as an ethical replacement would need to take this seriously. Many existing free code projects offer some of the elements needed to create a FB replacement, but none of them are anywhere near incorporating them all, and the problem of hosting remains unsolved.

In summary, I’m sceptical about trying to replace FB with a single service. I think we’re more likely to succeed by disaggregating its many features, replacing them with apps that do one thing well; chat clients, media-hosting services, events systems etc, and finding ways to bundle them together into community-hosted services that can each inter-operate with each other.

Update 2019-05-17Adrian Cochrane, the developer of the Odysseus web browser, has also been working on a proposal for a post-Javascript web.

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“If you’re seeing this message, that means JavaScript has been disabled on your browser. Please enable JavaScript to make this website work.”

- TechAsia.com

I use a browser add-on called NoScript, to choose if and when a website can run Javascript on my computer, and I’m getting pretty sick of websites refusing to even display text and images if I don’t agree to run their (often proprietary) Javascript. Let’s start telling both website developers and web browser engineers, loud and clear, that it’s time to #MakeJavascriptOptional!

Javascript is unique among programming languages, because the programs written in it are routinely downloaded and run on a person’s computer (in their web browser) without their knowledge or consent. It has been the subject of criticism by everyone from experienced software engineers and computer security researchers, to privacy campaigners and software freedom activists. Bad Actors can use Javascript to abuse people while they use the web, by tracking them (and there have been designs for tracking users with Javascript since 2006, if not longer), by spying on them (and this sort of spying has been going on since 2010 if not longer), by hijacking their computers, and so on.

Almost every time you open a browser tab and go to a website, another batch of invisible programs starts running on your computer, every one of them using up a bit more of your computer’s processing power and system memory. As each one starts running, it makes your computer a bit more sluggish and less responsive to you, like a kind of digital alcohol. Obviously, this degrades the user experience of the web, but most people don’t even realize it’s happening. They blame their internet connection, or assume their computer is just getting too old and they need a newer one, not realizing their computer could run much faster if it wasn’t carrying so much unnecessary Javascript. As well as using up system resources on the computers of web users when they run, the same Javascript programs are sent to millions of computers, over and over again, every time the websites that use them are visited, which is a wasteful use of both server resources and internet bandwidth.

So what can be done? Some people just disable Javascript in their web browsers, but that has the major downside of breaking the vast majority of the web, even a lot of ethical services running free code software (like CoActivate). Others use NoScript to tell us when a page wants to run scripts in our browser, and which web domain they are being served from, and allows us to choose if and when to let them run. Other add-ons focus on blocking specific kinds of threats that exploit Javascript, including anti-tracking tools like the EFF’s Privacy Badger (or the Privacy Possum fork) and adblocking tools like uBlockOrigin.

These kinds of tools are like wearing a suit of armour to protect against shark attacks while surfing, they can work, but they come with a fair bit of inconvenience. The long-term solution is to evolve the web so that we can eventually do without Javascript, just as the upgrade to HTML5 means we can add multimedia like audio, video, animations, and games, to the web, without proprietary plug-ins like Java, Flash, or Silverlight.

One recent trend in website design is to use a static website generator to create sites that display text, media, and links, with a sane page layout, using only basic web languages like HTML and CSS. This works fine for simple personal homepages, or  “brochureware” sites for community groups, public services, and businesses. But some web developers argue that the features Javascript can add to make web pages into “web apps” are arguably worth the costs. The federated photo-sharing app PixelFed recently modified its landing page to remove all the Javascript, which is a welcome move. But once you log in, you still need to allow the site to run some Javascript if you want to share photos and use the rest of the app’s features.

Other web developers have been coming up with proposals for replacing Javascript with other technologies that could provide the same benefits, the extra-for-experts features you can’t code in pure HTML/CSS, without its the downsides. New standards like WebAssembly have already been created to allow other, more robust languages to be used instead of, or alongside Javascript. Other developers argue that Javascript is fine for prototyping new kinds of web services, but before they’re rolled out for mainstream use, these features ought to be standardized, and build into the browser itself, or native apps. Like static sites, this would mean these chunks of code wouldn’t need to be sent over the net millions of times a day, every time users visit the same website.

One thing the developers of web browsers could do very easily to improve the situation, at least in the short term, is the same things they’ve done with cameras and microphones; ask the user’s permission. When a website wants to run Javascript, ask the user if they consent to that, and ask them if they want the browser to remember that decision next time it’s asked to run scripts from that source. In other words, build the functions of NoScript into every web browser.

It could also help to build a wiki to crowdsource information about what kinds of scripts websites are trying to fetch from this or that domain name, and what they do. Some scripts, like those from FontAwesome, just provide freely licensed fonts and icons, while others, like any associated with major web advertising companies, are almost always trackers of some kind, spying on website users. Making this kind of information available from a trusted source would help users that currently use NoScript to decide whether to allow them or not, and if opt-in Javascript does become a standard feature of web browsers, it would benefit everyone who uses the web.

Filed April 3rd, 2019 under free software, security

 PeerTube is a revolutionary new video hosting system created by a developer known as Chocobozzz.  Supported and funded by Framasoft, a French organization working on a project to  “de-Googlify the Internet“, PeerTube (as the name suggests) has been created as a potential replacement for YouTube and you can watch the intro video here, streamed from a PeerTube site. Excited software freedom geeks have been testing experimental versions of PeerTube for a couple of years now, and there are dozens of groups and individuals running PeerTube sites (or “instances”). In October of 2018, Framasoft proudly announced the release of PeerTube 1.0.

Finally, the wait is over, and PeerTube is ready for average users to dive in. But what what makes PeerTube different from existing independent video sites like EngageMedia or BitChute? First, a little background.

Since it first became possible to embed video files in websites, it’s always been risky to host your own videos on your own website. The reason is that even short video files are much, much bigger than text or image files, or even audio files. If your video goes viral, and you have hundreds or thousands of users trying to stream or download the video at once, you end up having to pay huge fees for the bandwidth that uses on your server, or even having your website break down completely because of the traffic jam.

For years, this has created a paradox where creators who publish their own video, or small, community-hosted video sites, get nowhere if none of their videos get attention, and get punished if any of the videos they host get too popular. Either way, they lose. This is why, with the exception of a few determined anti-corporate activists and free code hackers, most people host their video on a handful of giant, corporate-controlled hosts like YouTube and Vimeo.

What makes PeerTube sites different from other independent video sites like EngageMedia or BitChute is not the type of video they host, nor their moderation policies, but the way they all interconnect (or “federate”) with each other. Using new technologies like WebTorrent and ActivityPub (more on them later), PeerTube sites automatically combine their hosting power to form a federated, video-hosting network. Working together, they can compete with corporate video-hosting platforms like YouTube, something no independent site, and certainly no independent video producer, can afford to do alone.

Today, I started a project of reaching out to independent video producers to make sure they know about PeerTube and the fediverse it’s a part of, encourage them to make use of these tools, and offer support to help them do so. Here’s a generic version of the text I wrote, in case it’s useful to anyone wanting to do something similar.

“Great to see work you’re doing in independent film-making.

I note that your contact page links to a number of corporate-controlled media platforms (FarceBook, TheirsTube etc). Have you heard about the ‘fediverse’, the federated replacements for these centralized platforms, using free code (or “open source”) software? For example, there are a number of inter-connected micro-blogging networks that offer a replacement for the birdsite, including GNU Social, Mastodon, Pleroma, and Misskey, and users on any of the thousands of independent sites running any of these software packages can all communicate with one another, not just the users on their site (or “instance”).

Even more relevant to your work, is PeerTube, a network of video-hosting sites that are similarly inter-connected with each other. PeerTube sites use WebTorrent to allow users watching videos to help serve them to other viewers, reducing the bandwith load on the host if a video goes viral, and making it viable for organizations to host their own video directly. PeerTube sites also use inter-connect with the rest of the fediverse, allowing users to follow PeerTube channels, watch embedded videos, and comment on them, all from within their social media client.

If you need any help figuring out how these technologies could help you organize, promote, and distribute your work, please feel free to get in touch.”

Filed November 27th, 2018 under independent media, free software

At the end of last month, Mozilla Hacks announced a new series of “DWeb” posts on decentralized software projects, which aim to redistribute the power to host and share information on the web, and on the internet in general. Obviously it’s of great interest to Disintermedia, and this blog’s 2 readers. So far, there are articles on Scuttlebutt/ SSB, WebTorrent, and Beaker Browser (see the list at the end of the DWeb announcement article). Thanks to the fedizen - a citizen of the “fediverse” of federated social networks -  who brought this to my attention, sorry I can’t remember who it was right now.

I’m back in the studio, and intending to resume normal transmission next week. This will start with a run-down of the talks and workshops I attended at Open 2018 in London.

In the late 90s and early 2000s, there was a wave of radical community servers, many of which fed into (or grew out of), the Indymedia network. Most of those veterans have sadly vanished from the web, and RiseUp, Framasoft, Comunes (OurProject), and CoActivate, are among the few still standing. As awareness grows of tech corporations like Microsoft, Apple, Google, FarceBook, and Amazon, putting their users in a digital cage, it’s great to see a whole new wave of cooperative groups coming together to replace these Web 2.0 prison canteens with ‘digital cafes’, like CommonsCloud, Disroot, and Social.coop, which I’m starting to get involved with.

A digital cafe (or ‘Open App Ecosystem‘) is a community of users and hackers providing themselves and each other with web services like social media (social networking, open publishing, or both), and sharing the costs. Since they’re doing many of the same things, rather than reinventing the wheel by writing all their software from scratch, they use a range of free code software developed by other groups. Sometimes they donate towards the financial costs of the peer production project that develops the software they use, and in other cases they have the skills and the time to contribute back to the project.

Social.coop began as group of members who set up a cooperative to share the costs of a site running Mastodon, a federated microblog server. Social.coop users can interact not only with each other, and with users on other sites running Mastodon (”instances”), but they can also interact with users on any site connected to a larger “fediverse” of federated social apps. The software makes these interactions across the fediverse possible by using common standards for exchanging data between social sites, initially using an older standard called OStatus. More recently a new standard called ActivityPub was published by the W3C (World Wide Web Consortium), the body that maintains the official standards for HTML, and everything else about how the web works under the hood. ActivityPub was the final output of W3C’s Social Working Group, which has now been replaced by the SocialCG (Social Web Incubator Community Group).

Social.coop depends on the work of all these other organizations in different ways, to keep their digital cafe running. But what’s the nature of the relationship between a cooperative running a digital cafe, and the groups maintaining the software they use? Does their sustainability depend more on making sure the project developing Mastodon has good governance? Or working on ensuring the reliability of their own servers, tweaking the software to serve member’s specific needs better, and perhaps adding new services, to help attract more members who can help reduce the costs per member?

You can’t have a cafe without a reliable electric and gas supply to the kitchen (the “back-end” of the server that users don’t see), and good mood lighting so people can feel relaxed but still see what they’re doing (UI or “User Interface“). But you don’t build a successful cooperative cafe by focusing on the internal politics of the energy utility, or the lamp shop. You focus on building your membership / customer base (users), and your collective capacity to provide them with good coffee, good service, and good food (UX or “User eXperience“).

If your energy supply becomes unreliable, you switch providers. If a coop-owned energy supplier emerges, great, switch to that. #ForkOffTogether could be that, and if people want to pitch that to them, go for it. But we can’t say for certain exactly which software they’re going to fork yet. Pleroma and Hubzilla are already options for ActivityPub server. Of these two existing, ready-to-use ActivityPub servers, I would say Hubzilla’s community probably has the closest overlap of values with social.coop. IMHO both their back-ends perform better than Mastodon’s Ruby-on-Rails engine, but other options continue to emerge (like Pylodon).

It’s the same with the lamp shop (UI). At present social.coop happens to be buying energy and lamps as a bundled package from Mastodon. But we’re not stuck with either, and we don’t have to get them from the same supplier at all. There are already a bunch of other lamp shops around, whose lamps can plug into the same power sockets (server-to-client API) that Mastodon uses. These include Pinafore (which I’m using these days and loving), and Halcyon, which is modeled directly on the look and feel of the birdsite, so fediverse sites who use that will have the minimum transition pain for refugees from there. Other lamp shops will emerge, and some of the existing shops whose lamps use different power sockets (eg Qvitter) might become compatible in the future. Hopefully, in a year or two, everyone will be using the same power sockets and plug standard (ActivityPub server-to-client API), so all lamps will work with all electric suppliers.

In a digital cafe, the energy supply is the maintenance crew’s problem (tech working group). As long as the lights stay on, the rest of the members don’t have to care about how they’re powered. The lamp situation, on the other hand, is something the members/ customers have to put up with while they drink their coffee. Decisions about which UI options social.coop offers need to be made by the membership, within the range of options that can technically work right now. Keep in mind that members can also get takeaway coffee (using a portal like pinafore.social to connect to their current instance), so they do have lighting options beyond what the tech group can set up and maintain right now.

The most important thing, the thing that *isn’t* a distraction, ever, is the coffee, the service, and the food. If we don’t get the UX right, it doesn’t matter how health or unhealthy the workplace is down at the energy company or the lamp shop, because we won’t keep the digital doors open long enough for their long term survival to matter. I love to geek out on organizational structures too. I get it. If that’s your thing, by all means go help the #ForkOffTogether folks become a cooperative energy supplier that social.coop can buy from (if they’re reliable suppliers). I totally endorse that.

Clear as mud? I may have over-extended the cafe metaphor somewhat, and as the old saying goes, no metaphor bears close examination. Feel free to hit me up about what I mean by this or that on the fediverse.

Filed June 12th, 2018 under open social networks, free software

In 2016, I included a graph from Layer 3 Networking blog, in a rant about the tendency to put on weight over time that I’ve seen in even the most lightweight GNU-Linux DE (Desktop Environment). The blog piece I took that graph from gave a detailed run-down of the lightweight DE ecosystem, as it stood in 2013, which still serves as the most thorough introduction I’ve found on the subject.

Being 5 years old now, the graph can’t be treated as a true indication of how much RAM more recent versions of these DEs might use. But it does offer an idea of just how many different free code DEs are out there, some screenshots of what some of the lighter ones look like installed, and roughly how much RAM a wide range of them use relative to each other. It also gives the exact methods used to make the RAM use comparisons between DEs, which is important to whether their results are a fair comparison, and another reason I still consider this a useful guide despite being five years old.

Obviously, being 2013 data, some of the DEs mentioned are now superseded or defunct (eg E17, Unity), or merged (LXDE and Razor-QT are now LXQT), and other newer ones aren’t mentioned (Artemis, Moksha, Pantheon, Yunity, Zorin etc). Based on the numbers from the graph there, I’d say in 2013 you could break DEs down into 3 categories (RAM use numbers assume a freshly booted system running no extra user apps):

  • Small (0-20MB): TinyWM, 9wm, miwm, wm2, dwm, Ratpoison, olvwm, TWM, xmonad/mobar, JWM, i3, Blackbox, Sawfish, IceWM, PekWM, Openbox, Window Maker, awesome, FVWM, Fluxbox, Mutter
  • Medium (20-100MB): E17, LXDE, KWin, Mate, Trinity, XFCE, Cinnamon
  • Bloated (>100MB): Razor-QT, GNOME 3, Unity, KDE

The DEs I describe as bloated are clearly targeted at providing every imaginable widget and performance boost, for users with fairly new hardware, or middle-aged hardware that’s been upgraded or is unusually powerful. Unless you are a business with deep pockets, or someone else who upgrades your computer every couple of years so you can always run the newest software, I suggest avoiding the bloated category. That is, if you don’t want to end up switching to a lighter DE in a couple of years, as the hardware requirements of the bloated DEs continue to creep up towards the latest hardware.

Cinammon, a fork of GNOME 2 developed for the Mint distro, offers everything the average user needs from a desktop experience, while using significantly less RAM than older and more common DEs like KDE Plasma or GNOME 3. Mate, Mint’s lightweight DE, uses even less RAM, while still providing a familiar point-and-click desktop, with the bells and whistles familiar to Windows users who have used any version of Windows from 95 to 7. I’m typing this on an Acer Aspire One that’s nearly 10 years old, and the Mate desktop in the about-to-be-released Trisquel 8 runs fine, although I have improved the performance by doubling the RAM to 2GB and, more importantly, replacing the internal drive with an SSD (Solid State Drive). I can’t emphasize enough what a big difference the SSD makes.

If you still want to be using your computer in ten years time, especially if you bought a netbook or some other unusually under-powered PC like I did, I strongly recommend getting familiar with the pros and cons of the DEs in the small category. If I just want to play a game, I use Openbox, and I really notice how much better the heavier games run without all the extra desktop bells and whistles taking up resources. I intend to get into a habit of logging into Openbox whenever I plan to work on a long piece of writing, or anything else that doesn’t really require flipping back and forth between apps.

In summary, I can’t tell you which DE is right for you, and just to confuse you even more, the same DE can use a different amount of resources depending on which GNU-Linux distro you’re running it on, and even whether or not it’s the default DE for that distro. But it’s definitely worth doing some reading, and choosing one that not only does what you want right now, but will keep doing it for as long as you don’t want to have to switch to keep your computer usable.

Filed April 16th, 2018 under free software, open source

Today I spent a bit of time updating the Disintermedia page on free code OS for desktop use. I reorganised the content a bit so it’s easier to browse, and moved a few discontinued distros into the appropriate box in the summary table. There are a few distros I’ve tried since I last updated that page, like LMDE and PureOS, and a few more I’d like to test drive, like the new version of Heads (Dyne’s answer to Tails). So keep an eye out for more updates, hopefully soon.

Trisquel 8 is nearly ready for release, so I’ll be testing that this week. Watch this space for the cliff notes. For now, my everyday OS is still Trisquel 7 (based on Ubuntu 14.04), running on Bishop, a small laptop that’s almost a decade old. It’s working fine, now that I’ve maxed out the RAM (now 2GB, wow!), and replaced the internal disc with an SSD (Solid State Drive). To be honest, the SSD made much more difference to the performance, and it doesn’t hurt that I’ve almost doubled the storage space too (from 140GB to 240GB), even though I bought a smaller, cheaper SSD. If you are trying to keep an old laptop in use, I highly recommend getting yourself an SSD over buying more RAM.

Filed April 9th, 2018 under free software, open source

Every now and then, I contact the developers of an interactive website I’ve stumbled across to ask them where I can find their source code, and under what free code license(s). I’m usually asking because their software is clearly using some free code components imported from other projects, so I believe they have a moral obligation to return the favour, even if they’re not legally obliged to.

Their reply emails often focus on how likely it is that anyone would want to re-use their source code, and how that might affect their project. That’s understandable, but I’m asking for reasons I consider to be much more important. Here’s how I responded to one such email, doing my best to explain my concerns clearly, but also to write in a way that wouldn’t come across as pushy or unfriendly.

Whether or not anyone would want to re-use your code is an interesting question, but it’s not my primary concern here. What programs you choose to run on your computing set-up, and whether they respect your freedoms, is none of my business. But when I allow programs to run on my system, I want to know that those programs respect my freedoms.

Since I can’t even log into your site without allowing it to run JavaScript programs on my system, I want to know that the source code of those programs is publicly available, under a free code license. If that’s not the case, for all I know I could be exposing myself to the next FarceBook, and I’m not willing to do that, nor to recommend a site to others if that’s the case. This situation is discussed in more detail in as essay called ‘The JavaScript Trap‘.

As a bonus, when source code is publicly available, it can be audited for security flaws and other bugs by the tech community (many eyes make bugs shallow and all that), patches submitted to improve it, and so on. And yes, it’s possible that someone else might benefit from not reinventing the wheel, by re-using some of your code, just as you’ve done with other people’s code. But that just means helpful bug reports and patches are more likely, which saves you work, and improves your software. It’s a win-win.

If you decide that you’re up for this, I highly recommend joining the Open App Ecosystem group on Loomio. There are people involved from a number of different free code web apps, and it’s good place to chat about how to make inter-operation work smoothly (common protocols, standards etc). For example, Loomio itself is a decision-making app, and I can definitely see some potential benefits in being able to embed [name of project] elements in Loomio discussion threads.

As you can see, I don’t shy away from making a case for software freedom as a principle. But I also make sure I talk about the potential benefits for them, and invite them to become involved in the open source community, within which free code is nurtured. When we share, we create abundance, and being welcomed into communities that enact that principle is one of the best ways to encourage people to start doing the same.

Filed April 4th, 2018 under free software, open source

Mailing lists and web forums are both text media, supporting branching conversations. The only difference is the method of delivery and reply (email vs. web). As mailing list/ forum software continues to be developed, the distinction between the two is breaking down, because it makes sense to use a package that allows people to participate through either email or web interfaces, as they prefer.

Many modern mailing list server packages (like GroupServer) support forum-style subcription management, message searching, and direct replies. Many modern web forum server packages (like Discourse) allow for email delivery and replies. Loomio enables text discussions through both web and email, as well as decision-making using a variety of poll types (so more suited for teams than casual, open-ended discussions).

In response to a proposal on the Trisquel forums, I was thinking it would make sense to have a unified set of software freedom forums, on one website, with a range of topic-based forums, and help forums for specific projects (like libre distros, user applications, server packages, and so on). The question is, how would we assemble a critical mass of people who have time to admin, moderate, and participate? How would we make decisions about where to host? Which software to use? What to call it?

Then I thought, maybe if we want to get really ambitious, we could try to create a federated set of forums. Could ActivityPub, Zot, or another federation standard(s), be used to federate multiple forum packages on multiple hosts so that people can read, join, and post to a Trisquel Users forum from any one of those hosts? Could this help to solve the problems of community fragmentation (different groups silo’d on different hosts), without trying to herd everyone onto one host?

For now, the Trisquel forum admins have solved the problem of general software freedom discussions being held in the forum intended for helping Trisquel users having problems with installing or using the distro, by setting up a new General Free Software Talk forum on their boards. All welcome, don’t feed the trolls (we have the Troll Lounge for that ;)

Filed March 17th, 2018 under open social networks, free software

I was please to see a discussion on ‘P2P food system as a major environmental and social solution?‘ started by Robert LaRocque on the Loomio group of the CommonsTransition group. There are *so* many great resources on the transition back to a decentralized, sustainable food supply, thanks especially to folks like the biodynamics and organics movements, the permaculture and slow food movements that grew out of their compost heaps, and the transition movement that grew out of permaculture.

Firstly, check out the Localizing Food Project, spearheaded by one of my permaculture teachers, Robina McCurdy of Earthcare Education Aotearoa. Robina travelled the length of this country connecting with local food projects, and is producing a series of crowdfunded documentary films covering different aspects of them. The latest one is ‘Edible Paradise - Growing the Food Forest Revolution‘.

Secondly, have a browse through Appropedia, a crowdsourced mediawiki site for appropriate technology, PracticalPlants and Plants for a Future. which are the same thing but for articles about plants. There’s also OpenSourceEcology, a development project for appropriate tech based at FactorE Farms. Also WikiHouse, it’s not about food, but like OpenSourceEcology it does demonstrate the way the crowdsourcing and human-centred design principles behind wikis and free code software can be applied to creating new stuff on the physical layer.

Thirdly, it was great to see from the responses in the comments that there are Open Food Network folk participating in the group too. I had a great conversation about the OFN vision when I met OFN co-founder Serenity Hill at the first Open Source//Open Society. The P2P food network/ app idea is already being tried by folks like OFN, and here in Aotearoa, BuckyBox (now fully free code), and OOOBY (Out of Our Own Backyards), see OOOBY founder Pete Russell’s TEDx talk on ‘Hacking the supply chain‘ (sadly I believe OOOBY’s platform remains proprietary). I’m collecting notes about food coop and box scheme software on the Aotearoa Permaculture Network wiki.

Finally, a bit of shameless self-promotion, I wrote a paper for the FreeCulture2010 conference called ‘Free to Know or Free to Own? Convergence of Free and Slow Culture in Global Relocalisation‘. It looks at the parallels and points of overlap between the original ecology movement and what I sometimes call ‘digital ecology’, the worlds of free code, online commons, and green tech.

Filed November 15th, 2017 under free culture, free software, documentary
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