• 1080

last modified March 18 by strypey


Uncontested Facts about 1080

 

2000: Jean Aigueperse, 'Fluorine Compounds, Inorganic', published in Ullmann's Encyclopedia of Industrial Chemistry


Claims and Counter-claims about 1080

 

  What are the properties and effects of 1080?

 1. 1080 doesn't kill anything that eats it, as it only kills mammals, "its use has been limited because of the need in these countries [outside Aotearoa] to protect native mammals" - '1080: The Facts', NZ Forest and Bird and NZ Federated Farmers

 1. 1080 is highly toxic to any creature that breathes air, including all mammals, birds, and insects, and will kill anything that eats it.

2012: van Klink et al, 'The effect of aerial application of 1080 cereal baits on radio-tagged South Island fernbirds (Bowdleria punctata punctata)', published in New Zealand Journal of Zoology #2

2011: NZ Department of Conservation, 'DOC takes steps to prevent kea losses'

2007: State of Victoria Deparment of Primary Industries, '1080 Poison Baits for Pest Animal Control'

2008: Australian Pesticides and Vetinary Medicines Authority, 'Sodium fluoroacetate (1080) final review report and regulatory decision'

 2. No animals native to Aotearoa are harmed by 1080

 2a. 1080 drops result in a net rise in native bird populations due to the resulting reductions in predation, even when individual native birds are killed in 1080 drops.

2012: van Klink et al, 'The effect of aerial application of 1080 cereal baits on radio-tagged South Island fernbirds (Bowdleria punctata punctata)', published in New Zealand Journal of Zoology #2

  2b. 1080 drops have no discernible effect on the populations of native frogs.

 2. Kea, Weka, Morepork, Tomtits and Robins have been killed by 1080. Forest and Bird - '1080 FAQ' (retrieved 19/08/2010). "Bird repellents on bait and rules preventing “chaff” (small pieces) intended to protect birds are not effective", 1080Science. 1080 has also killed native Fernbirds 

2012: van Klink et al, 'The effect of aerial application of 1080 cereal baits on radio-tagged South Island fernbirds (Bowdleria punctata punctata)', published in New Zealand Journal of Zoology #2 

 2a. Given that "pest" mammals breed much faster than native birds, it seems unlikely that the impact of 1080 on mammal populations would be greater than the impact on native bird species.

 2b. 1080 can cause chronic health problems, particularly affecting reproduction, even when it doesn't exist in high enough concentrations to kill individuals.

 3. Because 1080 breaks down so quickly into harmless byproducts, untaken baits and carcasses of animals killed by 1080 pose no risk.

 3. 1080 takes a long time to biodegrade, remaining toxic for weeks, or months, depending on the temperature, and how wet the environment is

"It is important that the public adhere to the instructions on these warning signs which will remain in place until carcass monitoring shows that bait and carcass breakdown has been achieved which may take up to six months."

- OSPRI North Island Programme Manager Alan Innes, quoted by Matt Shand on Stuff.co.nz

 "Poisoned possum carcasses can pose a risk to dogs even up to 75 days after the control operation. Lower, less hazardous concentrations have been found in deer bone marrow after 213 days." - Eason et al, 2012.

2012: Eason et al, 'Secondary poisoning risks from 1080-poisoned carcasses and risk of trophic transfer—a review', published in New Zealand Journal of Zoology

 3a. Australian authorities recommend that untaken baits and carcasses of killed animals need to be removed from 1080 drop areas for up to 14 days after the completion of a drop to reduce poisoning of non-target species.

2008: Australian Pesticides and Vetinary Medicines Authority, 'Sodium fluoroacetate (1080) final review report and regulatory decision'

 4. 1080 is an effective way to control target species populations

 4. "1080 is not an effective way to control target species populations" - World League for the Protection of Animals - 1080 Poison (see 1080 Is Not An Effective Form Of Population Control)

 5. A number of countries also use 1080

 5a. Judicious 1080 use is supported by conservationists in other countries.

 5. 1080 is only used in aerial drops in New Zealand, although it has limited use in other countries. For example, it is banned in South Africa as a "classified as a Group 1, Category A hazardous substance".

 5a. Conservationists in the USA have been concerned for a long time about the effects of 1080 use on native predators, especially the risks of secondary poisoning. In South Africa, "Researcher and conservationist Rob Harrison-White said a lot of disinformation about the substance has been fed to the public".


 6. 1080 was first put into use as a rodenticide

2003: Weaver, Sean, Phd, 'Policy Implications of 1080 Toxicology in New Zealand', published in Journal of Rural and Remote Environmental Health

 6. 1080 was developed as an insecticide, and was first used as a moth repellent 

 


 7. 1080 is safe to use

 7. 1080 is dangerous to those working with it

2011: Eason et al, 'An updated review of the toxicology and ecotoxicology of sodium fluoroacetate (1080) in relation to its use as a pest control tool in New Zealand', published in New Zealand Journal of Ecology

 7a. 1080 is dangerous to members of the public and companion animals engaged in outdoor recreation (see 3).

 7b. 1080 is dangerous to wildlife (see 1).

 8. 1080 biodegrades quickly when wet, and has no impact on waterways.

1995: Meenken, Diederik, and Eason, Charles T., 'Effects on water quality of a possum (Trichosurus vulpecula) poisoning operation using toxin 1080 (sodium monofluoroacetate)', New Zealand Journal of Marine and Freshwater Research

 8. 1080 pollutes waterways

 

 Is reducing the risk of farm animals catching Bovine Tuberculosis (TB) from wildlife a good reason to use 1080?

1. Possums commonly carry TB

1. Possums seldom carry TB

2. Possums can infect farm animals with TB

 1999 NZ Vetinary Journal - 'A behaviour study on the potential for direct transmission of tuberculosis from possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) to alpacas (Lama pacos), and the converse from alpacas to possums'

2. It is unlikely or impossible for farm animals to catch TB from possums

2. 1080 is used in Aotearoa to protect the native bush.

2010 Forest and Bird - '1080 FAQ' (retrieved 19/08/2010)

2.The majority of 1080 used on Aotearoa is paid for by organisations wanting to stop wildlife spreading TB to stock

3. 1080 is the only effective way to stop TB infections spreading to stock by wildlife - 'In Support of 1080, Time to Speak Up?', Straight Furrow, 2009


3. There are alternatives to 1080 for preventing TB in stock

Points of Interest

 Primary Sources

 News Coverage

 

Improvement Notes

  • need to read all the recently added links and add any new claims found in them.
  • need to fix all the linkrot