• Biochar

last modified March 29 by strypey

CounterClaim |

Uncontested Facts about Biochar

  • The formal definition of biochar is "a solid material obtained from the carbonization thermochemical conversion of biomass in an oxygen-limited environments", to be used "as a soil amendment with the intention to improve soil functions and to reduce emissions from biomass" - International  Biochar Initiative (IBI)

Claims and Counterclaims about Biochar

 1. Adding biochar to soil does not consistently improve crop yields

 1. Adding biochar to soil improves crop yields

2006: B. Liang, J. Lehmann,* D. Solomon, J. Kinyangi, J. Grossman, B. O’Neill, J. O. Skjemstad, J. Thies, F. J. Luiza  ̃o, J. Petersen, and E. G. Neves, 'Black Carbon Increases Cation Exchange Capacity in Soils'

2011: Claudia Kammann et al, 'Influence of biochar on drought tolerance of Chenopodium quinoa Willd and on soil-plant relations'

 2. There's no conclusive evidence that the carbon from crop waste made into biochar stays in the soil

 2. Biochar sequesters carbon in the soil in the form of its own carbon, the increased soil life density it promotes, and the increased plant growth it promotes, more effectively than traditional methods like burning off crop waste, or making it into ethanol biofuel

2011: Claudia Kammann et al, 'Influence of biochar on drought tolerance of Chenopodium quinoa Willd and on soil-plant relations'

 

Points of Interest